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10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price

10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price.

10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price. Many people think that they require huge lot of money to invest in share market. But it is not so true.There are lots of company in Indian stock market whose market price is even less than the cost of a burger.

There are a number of penny stocks trading between Rs 1 to 10 (find more here). Even, big companies like Ashok leyland, Tata Power, Steel Authority etc are also selling at a market price lower that Rs 100. So, today I am listing the list of such 10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price.

10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price

S.No Company Price (In Rs)
1 Idea Cellular 86.70
2 Federal Bank 92.70
3 Ashok Leyland 82.50
4 Tata Power 85.55
5 Crompton Greaves 79.50
6 IDBI Bank 75.10
7 National HyroElectric Power Corporation (NHPC) 32.25
8 Reliance comm 36.80
9 SAIL (Steel Authority India Ltd) 63.85
10 Bombay Dyeing 83.50

Funny, the stock prices of these companies are even less than the Ola or Uber ride fare.  Still people speculate that buying stocks are expensive.

In addition, you can further find a list of large number of stocks, who range from RS 1 to 100  here: http://money.rediff.com/companies/price-sorted/10-100

Disclaimer: Please note that I am not recommending  you to buy these stocks just because their price is low. You should always buy a stock only when its selling at a bargain price. Bargain stocks are not such stocks whose share price is low. Its those stocks which are trading at a much lower than its intrinsic value.

Tags: 10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less, Indian stock market 10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price, 10 Common Stocks at Rs 100 or less as Market Price in India

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

10 Common Stocks that gave more than 100% return last year

10 Common Stocks that Gave More Than 100% Return Last Year -2017

10 Common Stocks that gave more than 100% return last year. Peter lynch, the legendary investor and fund manager, used to say ‘‘Invest in what you know’’ in his best-selling book “One up on the Wall Street”. By this he means –‘there are a number of common stocks which anyone can find easily around them if they are looking’. You do not need to find a rare petroleum stock which no over has ever heard.  You just have to look around and find some decent companies in your surroundings to invest in.

“Know what you own, and know why you own it.”

“The simpler it is, the better I like it.”

“The worst thing you can do is invest in companies you know nothing about. Unfortunately, buying stocks on ignorance is still a popular American pastime.”

– Peter Lynch

So, toady I have compiled a list of 10 such common stocks which a common people could have found easily while walking in their city or during travelling in the city-bus.

Here is the list of the 10 Common Stocks that gave more than 100 percent return last year. I hope few of them are in your portfolio for over a year.

10 Common Stocks that gave more than 100% return last year.

STOCK 8-May-17 9-May-16 % Change
SENSEX 29926.15 25688.86 16.49
NIFTY 9314.05 7866.05 18.40
INDIAN BANK 352 92.9 278.90
RURAL ELECTRIFICATION 216.6 84.82 155.36
FEDERAL BANK 118.9 49.15 141.91
BAJAJ FINSERV 4409.05 1875 135.14
SUN TV 851 364.5 133.47
PUNJAB NATIONAL BANK 176 82.8 112.56
BANK OF INDIA 185.4 89.35 107.49
INDIAN IOL CORP (IOC) 428.55 209.9 104.16
JAYPEE INFRATECH 14 6.95 101.43
MRF 67501 33650 100.59

Here is the list of other six common stocks that has given more than 50 percent return for the last year.

Best book to learn investing mindset: Rich Dad Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach their Kids About Money that the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! I highly recommend you to read this book.

10 Common Stocks that gave more than 50% return last year.

STOCK 8-May-17 9-May-16 % Change
GITANJALI  GEMS 68.75 35.65 92.84
HPCL 531.5 278.5 90.84
MARUTI SUZUKI 6626 3846.5 72.26
YES BANK 1616.25 945.05 71.02
APOLLO TYRES 240.45 157.2 52.95
TATA COMM 652.05 429.08 51.96

 

Tags: 10 Common Stocks that gave more than 100% return last year, List of 10 Common Stocks that gave more than 100% return last year 2016-17

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

Stock Market Timings in India cover

Stock Market Timings in India.

Stock Market Timings in India. There are two major stock exchanges in India- Bombay stock exchange (BSE) and National stock exchange (NSE). However, the timing of both BSE & NSE is the same.

First of all, you need to know that the stock market in India is closed on weekends i.e. Saturday and Sunday. It is also closed on the national holidays. You can find the list of the holidays of the stock exchange here:

https://www.nseindia.com/global/content/market_timings_holidays/market_timings_holidays.htm

The normal trading time for equity market is between 9:15 am to 03:30 pm, Monday to Friday.

The trading time for commodity (MCX) market is between 10:00 AM to 11:30 PM, Monday to Friday.

The normal trading time for Agri-community (NCDEX) market is between 10:00 AM to 05:00 PM, Monday to Friday.

In addition, there is no lunch break or tea break in the Indian stock market timings.

The timings of the Indian stock market are divided into three sessions:

  1. Normal session (also called continuous session)
  2. Pre-opening session
  3. Post-closing session

Now, let us discuss all these sessions to further understand their importance in the stock market timings in India.

Also read: Indian Stock Market Holidays 2018

Stock Market Timings in India.


NORMAL TRADING SESSION:

  • This is the actual time where most of the trading takes place.
  • Its duration is between 9:15 AM to 3:30 PM.
  • You can buy and sell stocks in this session.
  • The normal trading session follows bilateral matching session i.e. whenever buying price is equal to the selling price, the transaction is complete. Here transactions are as per price and time priority.

PRE-OPENING SESSION:

The duration of the Pre-opening session is between 9:00 AM to 9:15 AM. This is further divided into three sub-sessions.

  • 9:00 AM to 9:08 AM :
    • This is the order entry session.
    • You can place an order to buy and sell stocks in this duration.
    • One can also modify or cancel his orders during this period.
  • 9:08 AM to 9:12 AM :
    • This session is used for order matching and for calculating the opening price of the normal session.
    • You cannot modify or cancel buy/sell order during this time.
  • 9:12 AM to 9:15 AM :
    • This session is used as a buffer period.
    • It is used for the smooth translation of pre-opening session to the normal session.

Opening price of the normal session is calculated using multilateral order matching system. Earlier, the bilateral matching system was used which caused a lot of volatility when the market opened. Later, this was changed to multilateral order matching system to reduce the volatility in the market.

However, most people do not use the pre-opening session and only use the normal session for trading. That’s why there is still huge volatility even in the normal session after the pre-opening session.


The time between 3:30 PM to 3:40 PM is used for closing price calculation.

  • The closing price of a stock is the weighted average of the prices between 3:00 PM to 3:30 PM.
  • For the indexes like Sensex & nifty, its closing price is the weighted average of the constituent stocks for the last 30 minutes i.e. Between 3:00 PM to 3:30 PM.

POST-CLOSING SESSION:

  • The duration of the Post-closing session is between 3:40 PM to 4:00 PM.
  • You can place orders to buy or sell stocks in the post-closing session at the closing price.If buyers/sellers are available then your trade will be confirmed at the closing price.

NOTE: Pre-opening session and the Post-closing session is only for the cash market. There are no such sessions for future & options.

Overall, the stock market timings in India can be briefed as:

9:00 AM to 9:15 AM Pre-Opening Session
9:15 AM to 3:30 PM Normal Trading Session
3:30 PM to 3:40 PM Closing Price Calculation
3:40 PM to 4:00 PM Post-Closing Session

Stock Market Timings in India

Pic credit: http://www.bseindia.com/markets/equity/session_timings.aspx?expandable=0

In addition, if you are unable to trade between this time periods, you can place an AMO (Aftermarket order). There is no actual trading here but you can place your buy or sell order.

Further, the Indian stock market also opens a special trading session during Diwali, the festival of light. This is known as ‘Mahurat Trading’. Its trading time is declared a few days before Diwali. However, generally, Mahurat Trading timing is in the evening. You can find more details about mahurat trading here: 60-minute ‘Muhurat Trading’ on BSE, NSE this Diwali  

Also read: Are you ready for ‘Muhurat Trading’ this Diwali?

stock market timings

I hope this post on the ‘Stock Market Timings in India‘ is helpful to the readers. If you have any doubts feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you.

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

financial ratio analysis 1

8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know

8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know. The valuation of a company is a very tedious job. It’s not easy to evaluate the true worth of a company as the process takes the reading of company’s several years’ financial statements like balance sheet, profit and loss statements, cash-flow statement, Income statement etc.

Although it really tough to go through all these information, however, there are various financial ratios available which can make the life of a stock investor really simple. Using these ratios they can choose right companies to invest in or to compare the financials of two companies to find out which one is better.

This post about ‘8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know’ is divided into two parts. In the first part, I will give you the definitions and examples of these 8 financial ratios. In the second part, after financial ratio analysis, I will tell you how and where to find these ratios. So, be with me for the next 8-10 minutes to enhance your financial knowledge.

So, let’s start the first part of this post with the financial ratio analysis.

If you are a beginner and want to learn stock market, I will highly recommend you to read this book first: Everything You Wanted to Know About Stock Market Investing


Quick note: You don’t need to worry about how to calculate these ratios or remember the formulas by-heart, as it will be already given in the financial websites. However, I will recommend you to go through this financial ratio analysis as it’s always beneficial to have good financial knowledge.


financial ratio analysis trade brains

Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know:

  1. Earnings Per Share (EPS):

    This is one of the key ratios and is really important to understand Earnings per share (EPS) before we study other ratios. EPS is basically the profit that a company has made over the last year divided by how many shares are on the market. Preferred shares are not included while calculating EPS.

    Earnings Per Share (EPS) = (Net income – dividends from preferred stock)/(Average outstanding shares)

    From the perspective of an investor, it’s always better to invest in a company with higher EPS as it means that the company is generating greater profits. Also, before investing in a company, you should check it’s EPS for the last 5 years. If the EPS is growing for these years, it’s a good sign and if the EPS is regularly falling or is erratic, then you should start searching another company.

  2. Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E)

    The Price to Earnings ratio is one of the most widely used financial ratio analysis among the investors for a very long time. A high P/E ratio generally shows that the investor is paying more for the share. As a thumb rule, a low P/E ratio is preferred while buying a stock, but the definition of ‘low’ varies from industries to industries. So, different sectors (Ex Automobile, Banks etc) have different P/E ratios for the companies in their sector, and comparing the P/E ratio of the company of one sector with P/E ratio of the company of another sector will be insignificant. However, you can use P/E ratio to compare the companies in the same sector, preferring one with low P/E. The P/E ratio is calculated using this formula:

    Price to Earnings Ratio= (Price Per Share)/( Earnings Per Share)

    It’s easier to find the find the price of the share as you can find it at the current closing stock price. For the earning per share, we can have either trailing EPS (earnings per share based on the past 12 months) or Forward EPS (Estimated basic earnings per share based on a forward 12-month projection. It’s easier to find the trailing EPS as we already have the result of the past 12 month’s performance of the company.

  3. Price to Book Ratio (P/B)

    Price to Book Ratio (P/B) is calculated by dividing the current price of the stock by the latest quarter’s book value per share. P/B ratio is an indication of how much shareholders are paying for the net assets of a company. Generally, a lower P/B ratio could mean that the stock is undervalued, but again the definition of lower varies from sector to sector.

    Price to Book Ratio = (Price per Share)/( Book Value per Share)

  4. Debt to Equity Ratio

    The debt-to-equity ratio measures the relationship between the amount of capital that has been borrowed (i.e. debt) and the amount of capital contributed by shareholders (i.e. equity). Generally, as a firm’s debt-to-equity ratio increases, it becomes riskier A lower debt-to-equity number means that a company is using less leverage and has a stronger equity position.

    Debt to Equity Ratio =(Total Liabilities)/(Total Shareholder Equity)

    As a thumb of rule, companies with a debt-to-equity ratio more than 1 are risky and should be considered carefully before investing.

  5. Return on Equity (ROE)

    Return on equity (ROE) is the amount of net income returned as a percentage of shareholders equity. ROE measures a corporation’s profitability by revealing how much profit a company generates with the money shareholders has invested. In other words, ROE tells you how good a company is at rewarding its shareholders for their investment.

    Return on Equity = (Net Income)/(Average Stockholder Equity)

    As a thumb rule, always invest in a company with ROE greater than 20% for at least last 3 years. A yearly increase in ROE is also a good sign.

  6. Price to Sales Ratio (P/S)

    The stock’s price/sales ratio (P/S) ratio measures the price of a company’s stock against its annual sales. P/S ratio is another stock valuation indicator similar to the P/E ratio.

    Price to Sales Ratio = (Price per Share)/(Annual Sales Per Share)

    The P/S ratio is a great tool because sales figures are considered to be relatively reliable while other income statement items, like earnings, can be easily manipulated by using different accounting rules.

  7. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a key financial ratio for evaluating a company’s liquidity. It measures the proportion of current assets available to cover current liabilities. It is a company’s ability to pay its short-term liabilities with its short-term assets. If the ratio is over 1.0, the firm has more short-term assets than short-term debts. But if the current ratio is less than 1.0, the opposite is true and the company could be vulnerable

    Current Ratio = (Current Assets)/(Current Liabilities)

    As a thumb rule, always invest in a company with a current ratio greater than 1.

  8. Dividend Yield

    A stock’s dividend yield is calculated as the company’s annual cash dividend per share divided by the current price of the stock and is expressed in annual percentage.

    Dividend Yield = (Dividend per Share)/(Price per Share)*100

    For Example, If the share price of a company is Rs 100 and it is giving a dividend of Rs 10, then the dividend yield will be 10%. It totally depends on the investor whether he wants to invest in a high or a low dividend yielding company.

    Also Read: 4 Must-Know Dates for a Dividend Stock Investor

If you want to read further in details, I will recommend you to read this book: Everything You Wanted to Know About Stock Market Investing -Best selling book for stock market beginners. 

Now that we have completed the key financial ratio analysis, we should move towards where and how to find these financial ratios.

For an Indian Investor, you these are 3 big financial websites where you can find all the key ratios mentioned above along with other important financial information:

I, generally use money control to find the key financial ratio analysis. The mobile app for Money control is also very efficient and friendly and I will recommend you to use the mobile app.

Now, let me show you how to find these key ratios in Money Control. Let’s take a company, Say ‘Tata Motors’. Now, we will dig deep to find all the above-mentioned rations.

Financial ratio analysis -Steps to find the Key Ratios in Money Control:

  • Open http://www.moneycontrol.com/ and search for ‘Tata Motors’.
    financial ratio analysis 3
  • This will take you to the Tata Motor’s stock quote page.
    Scroll down to find the P/E, P/B, and Dividend Yield.
    financial ratio analysis 4financial ratio analysis 2
  • Now go to the ‘Financials’ tab and select ‘Ratio’ option [i.e. Financial  Ratio]
    Scroll down to find all the remaining financial ratios.
    financial ratio analysis 5

That’s all! These are the steps to do the key financial ratio analysis. Now, let me give you a quick summary of all the key financial ratios mentioned in the post.


Summary:

8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know:

  1. Earnings Per Share (EPS) – Increasing for last 5 years
  2. Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E) – Low compared to companies in the same sector
  3. Price to Book Ratio (P/B) – Low compared companies in the same sector
  4. Debt to Equity Ratio – Should be less than 1
  5. Return on Equity (ROE) – Should be greater than 20% 
  6. Price to Sales Ratio (P/S) – Smaller ratio (less than 1) is preferred
  7. Current Ratio – Should be greater than 1
  8. Dividend Yield – Depends on Investor/ Increasing preferred

In addition, here is a checklist (that you should download) which can help you to select a fundamentally strong company based on the financial ratios.

Feel free to share this image with ones whom you think can get benefit from the checklist.

5 simple financial ratios for stock picking

I hope this post on ‘8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know’ is useful for the readers. If you have any doubt or need any further clarifications, feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you.

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

dividend dates explained

Dividend Dates Explained – Must Know Dates for Investors

Dividend Dates Explained – Must Know Dates for Investors:

There are lots of investors in the stock market who buys a stock only for their dividends. A regular, consistent and increasing dividend per year is what these investors are looking for. In general, those investors who are planning for their retirement or a long-term investment with some yearly returns invest in dividend stocks.

What is a ‘Dividend’?

A dividend is a distribution of a portion of a company’s earnings, decided by the board of directors, to a class of its shareholders. Dividends can be issued as cash payments, as shares of stock, or other property.

A company’s net profits can be allocated to shareholders via a dividend. Larger, established companies tend to issue regular dividends as they seek to maximize shareholder wealth in ways aside from supernormal growth.

Souce: Invetopedia (http://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/dividend.asp)

Here is the list of some of the highest dividend paying companies in India: 10 Best Dividend Stocks in India That Will Make Your Portfolio Rich.

The timing of buying/selling is the most important factor for receiving dividends. You don’t want to buy these stocks if you won’t be getting any dividend. For example, if you buy these stocks after a certain time, the previous seller might get the dividend as he was holding the stock when the company was recording the name of the shareholder before distribution of dividends.

Therefore, it’s very important that you monitor the dates during the press conference by the company’s board of directors. It’s during the press conference (corporate announcements) when the company announces how much dividends they will give to the shareholders and the dates when the stockholders will get their dividends.

Also read: How to follow stock Market, 10 Must-Read books for Stock Market Investors

Understanding the dates mentioned in the corporate announcement is quite important for the investors as it decides the timing of trading of these dividend stocks. And this post for explaining those dates only. So, be with me for the next 5-8 minutes to understand the dividend dates explained for newbies.

Want to learn more? Here is a best selling book on stock market which I highly recommend to read: Beating the street by Peter Lynch

Dividend Dates Explained.

In general, there are 4 important dividend dates that every investor should know. They are:

  1. Dividend Declaration Date
  2. Record Date
  3. Ex-Dividend Date
  4. Payment Date

Among the all four, the Ex-Dividend day is of uttermost importance. You will understand the importance of this date as you read this complete article on the dividend dates explained.

dividend dates explained 2

For now, let’s understand all these dates first:

  1. Dividend Declaration Date:
    This is the date on which the company’s board of directors declares the dividends for the stockholders. The conference includes the date of dividend distribution, size of the dividend and the record date.
  2. Record Date:
    On the dividend declaration day, the company also announces the record date. The record date is the date on which your name should be present on the company’s list of shareholders i.e. record book, to get the dividend. Shareholders who are not registered as of this date on the company’s record book will not receive the dividend. According to the company, you are only eligible to get the dividends, if your name is on their book till this record date.
  3. Ex-Dividend Date:
    The Ex-dividend date is usually two days before the record date. In order to be able to get the dividend, you will have to purchase the stock before the ex-dividend date. If you buy the stock on or after the Ex-dividend date, then you won’t get the dividend, instead, the previous seller will get the dividend.After the company sets the date of record, the ex-dividend date is set by the stock exchange. So, the two days before the record date is generally used by the stock exchange to give the name of the shareholders to the company. The investors who buy the stock on or after the ex-dividend date won’t be listed in the record book of the company. So, if you purchase a stock on or after the ex-dividend date, you won’t receive a dividend until it is declared for the next time period.
  4. Payment Date:
    This is the date set the by the company, on which the dividends deposited are paid to the stockholders. Only those stockholders who bought the stock before the Ex-dividend date are entitled to get the dividend.

So, I hope you have understood all the dividend dates explained above. As I already mentioned earlier, the Ex-dividend date is the most important date among all. I will summarize the above dividend dates explained here:

Type Declaration Date Ex-Dividend Date Record Date Payment Date
Notes The date the dividend is announced by the company The date before which you must own the stock to be entitled to the dividend. The date by which you must be on the company’s record books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The date the dividend is paid to shareholders.

Now, let me give you an example of the company’s board of director’s press conference so that you get a good knowledge of the above dividend dates explained.

Hindustan Zinc Dividend:
“Shares of Hindustan Zinc will turn ex-dividend on Wednesday. The company is paying ₹27.50 a share as second interim dividend for fiscal 2016-17. The record date for the dividend is March 30. 2017”

You can read the complete post here: http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/markets/stock-markets/hindustan-zinc-to-turn-exdividend/article9604920.ece

In the above announcement, the company announced two important points-
Dividend =  ₹27.50 per share
Record date = March 30, 2017
The expected Ex-dividend date should be 28th march, 2017 i.e. those investors who buy the stock of Hindustan zinc before 28th Match will be entitled to receive the dividend.

Further, if you want to know the dates of the upcoming dividends payment date, you can get it from the money control website: www.moneycontrol.com/stocks/marketinfo/dividends_declared/

I hope this post about ‘Dividend dates explained’ is helpful to the readers. If you have any doubts or need any further help on the topic ‘dividend dates explained’ feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you out.

New to stocks and confused where to start? Here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

dividend dates explained 3

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Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?

This is one of the most asked questions by the beginners when they start investing in stock market. Different newbie investors  ask the same questionin different formats. It goes like this:

What should be the ideal amount to start investing in the Stock Market?

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?

I want to invest in stock market but I do not know how much to invest?

What should be the minimum amount can I invest in stock market for long term?

I want to invest in stock market, but I don’t have much money. Is there any any minimum number of stocks that I must buy?

The general answer to all these questions is ‘there is no minimum money required to start investing in the stock market in India.

You can buy stocks for even less than Rs 10 also if you find an interesting one (Indian stock exchanges BSE & NSE has a number of stocks pricing less than even Rs 10). You don’t need to have thousands or lakhs to start trading in India. Any amount from which you can buy a stock is decent enough to start trading, no minimum money to start trading in stock market required.

Here is a list of 10 popular companies whose stock prices are less than Rs 100 (as time of writing this post).

S.No Company Price (In Rs)
1 Idea Cellular 86.70
2 Federal Bank 92.70
3 Ashok Leyland 82.50
4 Tata Power 85.55
5 Crompton Greaves 79.50
6 IDBI Bank 75.10
7 National HyroElectric Power Corporation (NHPC) 32.25
8 Reliance comm 36.80
9 SAIL (Steel Authority India Ltd) 63.85
10 Bombay Dyeing 83.50

You can easily invest in these companies.  Funny, the stock prices of these companies are even less than the Ola or Uber ride fare that you take in your hometown.  Still, people speculate that buying stocks are expensive. In addition, you can also find a complete list of stocks who price range from Rs 1 to 100  here: http://money.rediff.com/companies/price-sorted/10-100

So, the answer to the question of ‘what is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?’ is that there is no minimum money limit required for starting stock trading in India.

minimum money I need to start stock trading-2

However, is this all that you wanted to learn from the topic of the post? I don’t think so.

The next big question should be then ‘How much should I invest in the stock initially -if there is no minimum money I need to start stock trading?.

The answer is that if you are new to the market and still in the learning phase, it is always recommended to start small. Invest as low as possible and focus on learning. Anything between Rs 500- Rs 1000 is good enough. You really don’t want to lose thousand of money at the start of your investment journey (and then promising angrily to yourself that you won’t ever return to the market).

But, this doesn’t mean that you should take this amount as a strict rule for your initial investment. Suppose, if you found a stock, which is bit costlier, say Rs 1200. But you have done your homework, read the stock fundamentals, and are confident that the stock will give a good return in the future, then, you should go for it. Anyways, as a thumb rule for the beginners, anything between Rs 500- Rs 1000 can be used as the first stock market investment amount.

Want to learn more? Here is a best selling book on stock market which I highly recommend to read: Beating the street by Peter Lynch

The best advantage of this thumb rule is that you won’t lose too much if the things don’t work out as you imagined. Maybe, you misinterpreted the stock or did the fundamental study wrong, or the stock price fell due to some bad fortune. Still, you won’t be affected too much financially by the loss. Nonetheless, this investment will teach you a few lessons. As the saying goes:

Failures are the best teachers.

From your first investment, you will learn a lot. Remember, it’s not always about winning. You should always remember this famous quote ‘Sometimes you win, & sometimes you learn’. Further, from your first investment, you will learn more important things. You will learn what things to do and moreover, you will learn what things not to do. Besides, losing a small money won’t affect your morale and you can come back in the game again, and next time even more prepared and informed.

On the other hand, if you win i.e. the stock performed well, then congratulations. You have done a good job! 

Your first investment teaches you a great lesson if it is a failure. On the other hand, if your first stock is a winner, it gives a tremendous joy and becomes a memory for the lifetime. Both ways, you’re gonna receive something. Either a lesson or joy.

For my case, I bought three stocks during my first investment. Out of three, two performed well and the third underperformed for three continuous months. Although the overall portfolio was in profit, still the returns were not as good as I expected. Therefore, I sold the third stock after the third month. (Quick spoiler: The third stock became a multi-bagger in next two year. But, I don’t have any regrets.)

For beginners, I will suggest following their stock portfolio for three-five months before investing heavily in the market. The initial big profits on your stock might give you a great confidence to keep buying additional stocks. But you shouldn’t be greedy at that moment.  You must remember that for beginners, it’s more important to learn how to do value investing, that to earn money. And once you have learned the basics, the game is yours.

Also read :

minimum money I need to start stock trading-4

100 minus your age rule

There is a famous rule regarding how much you should invest in the stock market and widely known as ‘100 minus your age rule’. The rule is based on the principle of gradually reducing your risk as you get older. The rules go like this. The percentage of the stock holding in your net worth should be equal to 100 minus your age.’

For example, Let’s say your age is 20 and your total savings till date is Rs 1000. Then, the amount that you should invest in the stock market should be (100-20) = 80% of your total net worth. In other words, you should invest Rs 800 in the stock market if you are of age 20 from a total saving of Rs 1000.

You can read the complete post about ‘100 minus your age rule’ here.

The X/3 Rule:

This is another popular rule for beginners to reduce the risk while investing. The rule says to invest the only x/3 amount in the beginning if x is the total amount you intended to invest in a stock. After a few weeks, you can invest your next x/3 amount to the stock if it’s doing good. And finally the last x/3 again after another few months.

For example, if you intend to invest Rs 10,000 in a stock, don’t buy from the whole amount all in one go. Invest only 10,000/3=  Rs 3,333 initially. If you find your investment growing, then you can add Rs 3,333 in the next round of investment and the last Rs 3,334 in the final round. The rule greatly minimizes the risk and helps in averaging out the purchase price.

Anyways, a minor problem with this rule it that it reduces the focused amount. Therefore, the final profit might be little less than expected if the whole amount was invested at the same time. Still, it’s a great rule for a stock market beginners and helped a lot of newbies to reduce their risk and losses significantly.

There is one more rule called the ‘75% profit rule’. However, it is more like a hypothesis that a rule. It states that if 75% of stocks in your portfolio are doing good, then you can invest further. For example, if you have bought 4 stocks and 3 of them are doing good, then it means that your strategy is working and you can increase your investment. The chances of all the stocks in your portfolio(4/4) working great is very limited. Even Warren Buffett, the greatest investor of all time, has some stocks in the portfolio which gives him negative returns.

In short, if 75% of your stocks are doing great, it means that your strategy is good and it’s not the luck that is driving your portfolio. In other words, if you have only one stock in your portfolio and its growing fast, there might be a luck factor. But if 7 out of 10 stocks in your portfolio are growing, it’s more because you did your research correctly.

That’s all. These are the basics tips and tricks for the beginners to invest in the stock market.  Also remember the answer to the original question ‘what is the minimum money I need to start stock trading?’ is that there is no minimum money you need to start stock trading. That is no lower limit for that minimum money you need to start stock trading.

One more thing I would like to add to this post. There are also some additional charges while buying a stock online and the buyer has to pay them. They are generally less than 1% of the amount of the transaction. The additional charges are brokerage charge, Service charge, STT etc. Therefore, you also have to keep these charges in mind during buying a stock. Although these are a very small amount, still they will add up in the final amount of the stock that you bought.

Hence, for all those who are asking ‘What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?’, the answer is that there isn’t a minimum money you need to start trading in India. Anything that suits you is good enough for the market. Any money at which you can buy a stock works fine for entering the market. Any amount that you are ready to invest, is great to start stock trading in India.

minimum money I need to start stock trading-3

Lastly, I hope my post ‘What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India’ is useful for the readers. If you need any further clarification or have any doubts, feel free to comment below. I’ll be happy to help you out.

If you are new to stocks and confused where to start, here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

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Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

How to trade in ICICI Direct? Buy:Sell Stocks

How to trade in ICICI Direct? Buy/Sell Stocks

How to trade in ICICI Direct? Buy/Sell Stocks– ICICI direct is one of the best online broker websites for buying or selling a stock on the stock market. Using ICICI direct, you can buy or sell a stock within two minutes using your phone/laptop. The brokerage charge for the ICICI direct is decent and the interface is very user-friendly to easily understand how to trade in ICICI direct.

In this post, we are going to discuss how to trade in ICICI direct. So, be with me for the next 5-10 minutes to learn the basics of trading with ICICI direct.

For those of you who are here for a quick answer, here is the video on how to trade in ICICI direct which can help you to learn the trading process fast. But, I do recommend you to read the complete post in order to get an in-depth knowledge of trading in ICICI Direct. Here it the video –

Youtube Video:

Source: ICICI Direct

First of all, you need to know that the market opens from 9:30 AM to 3:30 PM from Monday to Friday, excluding a few national holidays like Independence day, Republic day etc. You can get the complete list of holidays in a year from BSE/NSE website. So, basically, you can place an order to buy the stocks during market days when the market is opened from 9:30 Am to 3:30 PM. At this time you can place orders to buy the stock at the current market price or you can set a limit price (Say you want to buy a stock whose market price is 90, only when the price falls to 88. Then you place a limit price 88 against the market price which is 90).

You can also place orders outside the market timings i.e. before 9:30 AM or after 3:30 PM. But the order will be executed only when the stock market opens. Although these are advantageous for those who can’t place an order during the market time, there are few disadvantages of placing the orders after market timings.

For example, you won’t know the opening price of the stocks for the next day, so it might open at a higher price the next day which may lead you to reset your order price or cancel (and you might even not be able to buy the stock). So, it would be preferable to place orders for the stocks only during the market time so that you have the full information on the current market price of the stock.

Now that you know about the background of the stock market timings, let’s move towards the topic of the post – how to trade in ICICI direct? Buy and sell stocks.

If you need help in opening your stock brokerage account, feel free to check out this awesome website- Nifty Brokers

Step by step guide for How to trade in ICICI direct:

Step 1: Login to your ICICI Direct account

First, you need your account credentials to login in the ICICI direct. If you open a 3-in-1 (Saving+Demat+Trading) account in ICICI Direct, you can have the access to buy/sell and hold your stocks using the same account. Therefore, if you are new to trading, I will suggest you open a 3-in-1 account in ICICI Direct.

After you have opened your account in the ICICI direct, you will get your username and password to log in. The first step is to the google and search, ‘ICICI Direct’. Open the first link that comes in the search engine (www.icicidirect.com). Then click on login in the top right-hand corner. The website will ask your credentials like username, password, and date of birth/pan card. After entering the correct details, you can enter inside your ICICI direct account.

STEP 2: Allocate funds for buying stocks

The next step after logging in your ICICI direct account is to allocate funds in the trading account.

The concept of allocating funds in very simple. Let’s say you have Rs 50,000 in your saving accounts in ICICI bank (or any other bank linked to your trading and demat account). And you want to buy stocks worth Rs 500. Then, you need to transfer that amount from your saving account to the trading account so that you can place the order of the stock worth Rs 500. This can be done by allocating the fund.

‘Allocate fund’ option can be found on the landing page after logging and is highlighted here.

Typically, this step of allocating funds can be done within a minute if you have a 3-in-1 ICICI Direct account. The steps are as follows:

  • Go to the option Secondary, Market Equity, ETF (Note: if you want to buy IPO, Mutual funds then you have to go to other option).
  • Select ‘ADD’ option and enter the amount you need to add.
  • Then, click on ‘Submit’.
  • You can see the allocated fund in the ‘Current Allocation’ after submitting.

Step 3: Place order for the stock

This is the third and final step for purchasing stocks using ICICI direct. After allocating the fund, you should select the option ‘Place order’, which is present in the equity option. This option is highlighted here:

After selecting the place order, you have to follow the following steps. The steps are simple and can be performed within a minute:

  1. First, select the ‘Cash’ option in the Product.
  2. Next, you have the option to select the stock exchange. You have two options- NSE (National stock exchange) or BSE (Bombay stock exchange). You can choose anyone and it doesn’t make much difference as prices are almost the same on both exchanges and follows an almost the same trend. (I generally prefer NSE.)
  3. Then you can view your limit on how much money you have to buy the stocks. This is the allocated money which you added in step 2. If you need more money, you can add amount by allocating extra funds.
  4. Now enter the stock. For example, if you want to buy a stock of ‘Tata Motors’, start typing ‘tata mot..’ on the stock option. The drop-down options will appear and you can select your stock from the list.
  5. Next, you need to enter the quantity. the number of stocks that you want to buy.
  6. After that, you have to select that option for order validity. Here you have three options – DAY, IOC or VTC. If you want to place an order for that day only, you should select Day. If you are placing a limit price and want to continue the placed order for the next few days, then you can select VTC 0valid till cancellation. (Prefer ‘day’ order)
  7. Next, you have to select the Order Type. There are two options here – Market and Limit. I have already explained these earlier in this post. If you want to buy the stock at the current market price select ‘Market’ option. If you want to buy the stock at a limit price, select the ‘Limit’ option.
    For example, let’s say that Tata motor’s stocks are currently trading at a market price of Rs 469.10. If you want to buy that stock at market price, then you should select the ‘Market’ option. If you want to buy the tata motors stock only when the price is Rs 465 or lower, select ‘limit’ option.
  8. If you have selected ‘limit option’ in the Order Type, then you need to enter the ‘Limit Price’ in the next step. (This is Rs 465 in the previous example of Tata motors).
  9. The last option is the stop loss trigger price. You can leave this option blank and is not a must-fill option. This is an order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit an investor’s loss on a position in a security. You can study more about stop trigger price here.
  10. Finally, select ‘Buy Now’

After clicking on ‘Buy Now’, you will be directed to a confirmation page. You need to confirm the details. And Tada!!!! You have bought a stock! Congratulations!!!!

If you want to re-confirm the stock that you’ve bought, you can do check by selecting the option ‘TRADE BOOK’ in equity. The option is highlighted here.

So, that’s all. This is the process of How to Trade in ICICI Direct.

Quick Note: After the trade in complete, it generally takes two-three days for the stock to reflect in your portfolio. Do not worry if can’t find the stock in your portfolio on the very next day since you executed the trade. It will eventually show up. The process takes T+2 days for transferring it from the previous owner to your account.

That’s all. I hope this post is useful to the readers. If you have any doubts or need any additional help, feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you out.

New to stocks and confused where to start? Here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

Tags: How to trade in ICICI Direct, How to trade in ICICI Direct in India, buy stocks how to trade in ICICI Direct, How to trade in ICICI Direct demat account, How to trade in ICICI Direct trading account

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

How to buy a stock in Stock Market? Step-By-Step Explanation.

How to buy a stock in stock market? Now a day, buying a stock is as simple as recharging your mobile or transferring money. All you need is a computer with internet connection, a bank account and some money in that account, obviously.

If you have seen movie Guru (in which Abhishek Bachchan was in leading role based on the life of Dhirubhai Ambani), the scenario of the stock market might scare you. But it was something like 50-60 years back. Now, no physical appearance, no much paper works are required. You can buy a stock sitting in your room in front of your laptop and that too within 2 minutes. How? That’s what I am going to teach you now. How to buy a stock in stock market? Just be with me for the next 5-10 minutes.

Buying shares online is the easy task, but I believe first you need to find that right stock that you should buy. There are few basic works which you should go through to find the best stock for you:

Read and Research:

There are tons of websites on the internet where you can get tutorials for stock market basics and about how to buy a stock in Stock Market? For beginners, I will recommend following websites of moneycontrol, economic times and Investopedia – Sharper Insight. Smarter Investing, Learn how to follow Stock Market and trends- Trade Brains

There are few books which are must-read for the beginners in the stock market. They are:

  • The Intelligent Investor
  • One Up on the wall street
  • Beating the street
  • Common Stocks and uncommon profits

You can read further about Indian stock market from the following useful links:

Now after learning the basics, the main tasks begins. You need to learn how to follow the stock market, their trends, their fluctuations etc.

Get good financial knowledge:

A good financial knowledge is a key for the success in the stock market. You need to understand the fundamentals before entering the stock world. The basics of Earnings per share(EPS), P/E Ratio, Book Value, P/BV, Dividend, Return on Equity(ROE), Return on capital employed(ROCE), debt/equity ratio etc should be known to you before you analyze a stock. You can read further about from these links: Investment BasicsSix Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch

Make your dummy portfolio:

A portfolio is nothing but your collection of stocks from different or same sectors. A portfolio shows how many shares you are owning from which sector. Generally, a good portfolio maximizes the profit and minimizes the risk. You can learn how to create your portfolio from this link: How to create your Stock Portfolio?

Follow the stock you’re interested in for few days:

The last step before buying a stock from the stock market is to learn how to follow stocks in the stock market. You should know how to track stocks so that you can buy/sell them at the best time. I advise the beginners to at least follow the stocks for 1 month before buying them. You can learn how to follow a stock from this link: Learn how to follow Stock Market and trends- Trade Brains.

Want to learn more? Here is a best selling book on stock market which I will highly recommend to read: Beating the street by Peter Lynch

Now that you know all the basics for the stock market, you can move further on How to buy a stock in Stock Market?


How to buy a stock in Stock Market?

The basics requirements for buying a stock in the stock market are:

  1. Stockbroker: General people can’t go to a stock exchange and buy/sell stocks. Only members of the stock exchange can buy and sell and they are called the brokers. Every broker should be registered on the Securities and exchange board of India(SEBI). There are a number of brokers/ sub-brokers which you can choose for trading. Some online brokers are Sharekhan, Kotak Securities, ICICI Direct, 5paise and India Bulls.
  2. Saving Account: Obviously you need a saving account for trading in the stock market.
  3. Demat A/C: It’s very simple to open a demat account. Now a day, the banks even offer you to open a 3-in-1 account, i.e. all three Saving+ Demat+ Trading account, by filling few forms just once. The 3-in-1 account will save your timing a lot and I recommend you to open a 3-in-1 account if you want to start trading in the stocks. You can open it in banks like ICICI, SBI, Kotak etc.

    You can decide your online broker for opening demat account depending on the different factors like brokerage charges, facilities offered, annual maintenance charges etc. Here is a link which you may find useful: Compare Online Share Brokers In India And Find Best Stock Broker In India.


    Note: If you open a 3-in-1 account you won’t need to find a stockbroker as the trading account is already included in it.

  4. Laptop and Internet connection: Obviously, the soul of modern era which is a must for all the online facilities.

how-to-buy-a-stock-in-stock-market

NOTE:

The documents required to open a 3-in-1 account are PAN card, Aadhar Card (for address proof) and an ID proof (generally Aadhar/Pan card can also be used as ID card). Once you opened your demat account, you will receive your username and password, and then you can start trading using your account

Also Read:

How to trade in ICICI Direct? Buy/Sell Stocks
How to buy a Stock using SBI demat account?

I hope this post about ‘how to buy a stock in Stock Market’ is useful for the readers. Feel free to comment below or message me if you have any doubts or if you need any further help.

New to stocks and confused where to start? Here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch

Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch:

Peter Lynch is the renowned American investor and ex-manager of Magellan fund at Fidelity investment. He is famous for his averaged 29.2% annual return for the duration of 13 years. The prodigal mutual fund manager divided the stocks into six categories during his investment experience. Namely: slow growers, stalwarts, fast growers, cyclical, asset plays, and turnarounds.

We are also going to follow lynch’s path.  Here are the categories with the examples of stocks from Indian markets so that they are easier to understand.

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Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch:

1. Slow growers / Sluggards

Slow growers, which originally once were fast growers, can be identified easily with a slow growth rate i.e. a low upward slope of earnings growth and stock price. The growth is usually between 2-5%. They can also be identified by the size and generosity of their dividend.

Peter Lynch did not like to spend time on these ‘sluggards’ and his portfolio consisted of very less percentage of slow growers. According to him, the only reason to buy these stocks is their dividends. They generally give a very good dividend (about 4-6%) and are a good asset during the recession as its very unlikely for their stock to feel too hard.

Example: Reliance, Power Grid Corp

2. The Stalwarts

They are the second type of categories of the Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch.

These stocks have average growth rate and are usually large companies that have earnings growth in the 10-12 percent range – higher than the slow growers.

According to Peter lynch, you can get a good return from these stocks if you wait for a long time. They generally end up from two-baggers (two times your buying price) to four-baggers. It’s good to have few stalwarts in your portfolio.

Example: HPCL, Bajaj Auto, Mahindra & Mahindra

Best book for Stock Market Beginners– If you are new to stocks, I will highly recommend to read ‘ONE UP ON THE WALL STREET‘ by Peter Lynch. It is available currently at the best price on Amazon.

3. The fast growers

The fast growers are everyone’s first choice. These stocks are generally small aggressive new enterprises and they grow at an impressive rate of 20-25% per year. But one should be open-eyed when they own a fast grower. There is a great likelihood for the fast growers to get hammered if they run out of steam and become a slow grower.

Peter lynch’s portfolio consisted mainly of the fast growers. He looks for fast growers with good balance sheets and which have good profitability. This category is also the lynch’s favorite among the Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch

Example: MRF, Eicher Motors, axis bank, Infosys, Maruti

4. The Cyclicals

The Cyclical can be distinguished from the fast growers as the cyclical keep on expanding and contracting and again repeating the same cycle (while the fast growers keep on expanding). They tend to flourish when coming out of a recession into a vigorous economy.

Automobiles, Metals, Chemicals, Tyres etc are the examples of the cyclical. Their charts tend to be very up and down over time. It is advised to owning the cyclical only on the right part of the cycle.  That is when they are expanding. Sometimes, it even takes them years before they perform. Timing is everything and you need to be able to detect the early signs that business is falling off or picking up.

Example: GAIL, Coal India, SBI

5. The turnarounds

The turnarounds are identified by Lynch as ‘no growers’ rather than ‘slow growers’. They are potential fatalities that have been badly hammered by the market for one or more of a variety of reasons. But they can make up lost ground very quickly.

Peter lynch identifies different types of turnarounds in his book ‘One up on the Wall Street’ and admits to being burnt by a number of them but suggests that the occasional success can be exciting and rewarding.

Example: Tata Steel, Phoenix Mills etc

6. The Asset Plays

This is the last category from the Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch.

The asset plays are those stocks whose stocks are greatly undervalued and those stocks that have assets overlooked by the market. These assets may be simply cash that the company is holding but which is not valued when there has been a general market downturn. The cash may be worth more than the market capitalization of the company.

Many of the PSUs are key asset plays because of the real estate property they are holding. For example- State bank of India. SBI has over 24,000 branches all over India. A similar example is ONGC.

Peter lynch understands the worth of the asset plays. He suggests owning few of these stocks in your portfolio as they are most likely to give you a good return in the future. The only significant thing in these stocks is to carefully find these stocks and right estimate for the worth of the assets. If you are able to do it, own that stock.

Try it out yourself!

So, these are the six different types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch. If you followed the post, you can also easily categorize any stock in the six types given above. So, go on, play around different stocks and classify them accordingly to above categories.

NOTE: The research on Six Different Types of Stock in Indian Market according to Peter Lynch is derived from his Book ONE UP ON WALL STREET.

Further, please comment below with the name of stocks that fits the above categories. I will really appreciate it and it will be very beneficial for the other post viewers.

New to stocks and confused where to start? Here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

BSE initial public offering in the market on 23 January at Rs 805- 806

BSE Initial public offering (IPO) is set to enter the market on 23 January. The bidding will be open until 25 January. The analysts are expecting a huge demand for the issue of the oldest stock exchange in asia.

The issue price for the Bombay stock exchange initial public offering will be Rs 805 – 806 per share. The minimum order quantity will be 18 shares.

Here are the details about the BSE Initial public offering:

Issue Open: Jan 23, 2017 – Jan 25, 2017

Issue Price: Rs. 805 – Rs. 806 Per Equity Share
Minimum Order Quantity: 18 Shares
Market Lot: 18 Shares

Face Value: Rs 2 Per Equity Share

Issue Type: Book Built Issue IPO
Issue Size: 15,427,197 Equity Shares of Rs 2 aggregating up to Rs 1,243.43 Cr

Know more here.

PM Modi Inaugurates the India International Exchange (INX) at GIFT city.

For an auspicious day for the India’s financial sector, Prime minister Narendra Modi inaugurated the India International Exchange (INX) located at the International Financial Services Centre (IFSC), Gujrat International Finance tech –city (GIFT City), Gandhinagar on Monday, Jan 9, 2017.

The INX is a owned subsidiary of Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) Ltd and is expected to start trading from 15th January 2017. The new exchange will greatly improve the service and quality of transactions across the world.

Here are 5 important updates about India International Exchange (INX):

1) INX at will be open for trading for 22 hours every day. The trading will open daily at 4 am (when exchanges in Japan opens), and close at 2 am (when exchanges in the US closes).
2) World’s fastest international exchange: India INX will be the fastest international exchange in the world with a median trade speed of four microseconds, in terms of order response time,. This is way better than the second ranked Singapore International exchange (60 microseconds) and domestic BSE’s exchange at Mumbai (6 microseconds).

3) The India INX can trade securities and products other than Indian rupees. The securities and products that could be traded on the India INX are: equity shares of companies incorporated outside India, debt securities, depository receipts, index based derivatives, currency and interest rate derivatives, commodity derivatives and similar other securities.

4) A highly robust risk management system is in place to prevent money laundering and market manipulation.

5) A huge investment of Rs 500 Crore will be invested by the Bombay stock exchange in the upcoming three years. Further, INX will begin operations with 100 employees, most of whom have relocated from Mumbai, apart from local and foreign personnel.

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting

What are stocks? And what is a Stock Market?

What are stocks?

What is a stock market?

What is Bombay stock exchange (BSE)?

What is National stock exchange (NSE)?

What is Sensex?

What is Nifty?

What is meant be Sensex/Nifty is up or down?

How does upward or downward movement of Sensex/Nifty affect the growth of the country?

What is bull and bear market?

 These are the major questions which are repeatedly asked by the common people of India whenever they hear the financial news of the television or the newspapers or magazines. Although a simple definition of all the above terms can be found easily in a book or internet, it would be simpler and more interesting if we explain the whole scenario in the story form. Later, we will give the standard definition for all the above terms for your better understanding.

It all starts with a company. Let’s say there is a company X. It is a manufacturing company and is doing well in its sector. Now it wants to expand by doing some project or research and development(R&D) in his field. For this company requires capital (money).

 At first, the company will try to get the capital from all the owners to expand the company. Further, when the owners aren’t able to meet the capital needs, it will go the biggest money source, the banks. But this will only increase his debts along with the interests. So, what options the company X has now? Where can the company X get such a large capital from?

The answer is public. The company can collect a large sum of money by giving a little ownership of the company to the public.

 And here begins the journey of the company in the stock market. A stock market (ex BSE, NSE) is a place where the company will be able to present his ownership (in the form of the stocks) to the public. And why will the people buy the stocks of the company X? It totally depends on how positive the people is about the growth of the company in terms of sales, earnings, revenue etc. If the people think that the company will be able to grow to new heights, or if the people believe in the visions of the company X, then, they will buy the stocks to trade their money with the ownership of the company.

 Thus by giving the portion of the ownership, the company is able to pool a great amount of money for its growth and development.

Generally, the company does not offer its complete shares to the public. Almost all of the times the owners (promoters) keep a portion of the stock with them to keep the ownership in their hands.

For example, let’s say the company X decided to provide 10,00,000 shares. Out of the total, it decides to offer 7,00,000 shares to the public and remaining 3,00,000 shares with them. Here, the promoters share will be 30%.

 {We would also like to define the term free-float market capitalization here. It is the product of the total shares offered to the public and the price of per equity share. Let’s say the company X each share price costs Rs 50 and it offers 7,00,000 public shares. Then, the free float market capitalization here will be equal to 50*7,00,000. The total market capitalization (not-free float) will be 50*10,00,000}.

 Now that the company X has decided to enter the stock market. When, the first time the company enters the market, it has to provide an offering price for the shares. This is called initial public offering i.e. IPO (we will discuss IPO in details in later sections). The IPO is offered in the primary market, where the seller is the company and the buyer is the public.

 After the IPO, the stock goes to the secondary market, where the buyer and sellers both are the public. Here, the public generally exchanges the ownership of the company.

That’s the story of the stock and the company X. In the next section, we will discuss the two stock markets in India i.e. Bombay stock exchange (BSE) and National stock exchange (NSE) and their indexes (Sensex/Nifty).

If you want to learn Indian Stock market from scratch, I will highly recommend you to read this book: Bulls, Bears and Other Beasts: A Story of the Indian Stock Market by Santosh Nair

What are stocks? What is a stock market? -Summary

Stock:  A stock is a general term used to describe the ownership of any company. Stock represents a claim on the company’s assets and earnings. As you acquire more stock, your ownership stake in the company becomes greater. Shares, equity, or stock, all basically means the same thing.

Stock Market: The stock market is the market in which shares of publicly held companies are issued and traded either through exchanges or over-the-counter markets. It is a place where shares of publicly listed companies are traded.

The stock market can be split into two main sections: the primary market and the secondary market.

  • Primary Market: It’s where new issues are first sold through initial public offerings. Retail Investors, mutual funds, domestical and foreign institutional investors buy the share from the promoters. Institutional investors typically purchase most of these shares during this first-time issue by the company.
  • Secondary Market: All subsequent trading goes on in the secondary market where participants include both institutional and individual investors.

Initial Public Offering (IPO): An IPO is the first time that the stock of a private company is offered to the public. It is a source of collecting money from the public for the first time in the market to fund its projects. In return, the company gives the share to the investors in the company. IPOs are often issued by smaller, younger companies seeking capital to expand, but they can also be done by large privately owned companies looking to become publicly traded.

Market Capitalization: Market Cap or Market capitalization refers the total market value of a company’s outstanding shares. It is calculated by multiplying a company’s shares outstanding by the current market price of one share. The investment community uses this figure to determine a company’s size, as opposed to using sales or total asset figures.

Hi, I am Kritesh, an NSE Certified Equity Fundamental Analyst. I’m 23-year old and an electrical engineer (NIT Warangal) by qualification. I have a passion for stocks and have spent my last 4+ years learning, investing and educating people about stock market investing. And so, I am delighted to share my learnings with you. #HappyInvesting